As you will see, I have changed the format of my monthly wrap up post in two ways.  First, I am going to start including links to noteworthy decisions that I come across or are forwarded to me.  Unfortunately, since neither I nor other bloggers writing in this space can cover everything, this will be a useful feature for those practicing in this area.  Second, I am going to provide more commentary on some posts and cases, in the hope of creating further dialogue on many trade secret and non-compete issues.  Given the hot button nature of some of these issues, I am going to share my thoughts, for whatever they are worth.  Now, on to posts and links from the last month:

Legislative Developments

  • Last week, Democratic Senators Elizabeth Warren, Chris Murphy and Ron Wyden announced their intention to introduce the Workers Mobility Act (WMA) that would abolish non-competes throughout the United States.  As many of you will recall, Senator Murphy previously introduced a similar bill, the Mobility and Opportunity for Vulnerability Employees Act (MOVE) but that bill stalled on the Senate floor.  Russell Beck has a post with a link to the House and Senate bills, along with his well-reasoned concerns about the breadth and scope of the bills.
  • A blog post about legislation over non-competes wouldn’t be complete if there wasn’t some mention of some activity in Massachusetts.  Key features of the latest bill under serious consideration would limit non-competes to 12 months (unless the employee stole trade secrets or breached his fiduciary duty) and finally adopt the UTSA.  For more details, see Russell Beck’s post in his Fair Competition Blog.
  • Idaho (repealing its recent changes in 2016) and Utah (restricting their use against broadcasters) have recently amended their statutes addressing restrictive covenants.  See Russell Beck again.
  • Colorado has modified its law affecting physician non-competes, carving out protections for physicians treating patients with rare genetic disorders to eliminate any interruption of care for those patients.  Peter Greene summarizes the changes in Epstein Becker’s Trade Secrets & Employee Mobility Blog.

Continue Reading Monthly Wrap Up (May 8, 2018): Noteworthy Trade Secret and Non-Compete Cases, Developments and Posts

01102013Here are the noteworthy trade secret, non-compete and cybersecurity stories from the past week, as well as one or two that I missed over the past couple of weeks:

Trade Secret and Non-Compete Posts and Articles:

  • In yet another non-compete case involving a physician, an Illinois appellate court has affirmed a trial court’s rejection of a covenant not to compete because the employer, a medical clinic, lacked a protectible interest in the patient base at issue. Jeff Glass reports on the case, Gastroenterology Consultants of the North Shore, S.C. v. Meiselman, M.D., et al., for SmithAmundsen’s Labor and Employment Law Update. According to Jeff, the following facts caused the court to side with the doctor: prior to forming the corporation, he practiced for a decade in the area; after forming the clinic, he continued treating these patients and personally billed them, as opposed to the clinic; the clinic did not help him with advertising or marketing; and finally, his compensation depended on his independent practice.
  • “U.S., China Aim To Curb IP Theft Standoff With Talks” reports Law360.
  • Looking to protect your trade secrets under Chinese law? Then consult “Chinese Translation: Protecting Trade Secrets in China Requires Knowing Complex Layers of Laws and Practices,” by Mimiao Hu, Shelley Zang and Xiang Wang for Orrick’s Trade Secrets Watch.
  • “Former engineer at Bergen County based company charged with stealing trade secrets,” reports NewJersey.com. Ketankumar “Ketan” Maniar planned to relocate to India with trade secrets stolen from his employer, Becton, Dickinson and Company, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman said.
  • For companies looking for a trade secrets lawyer, Kenneth Vanko has some fine practical advice, “The Employee’s First Client Meeting,” in his Legal Developments in Non-Competition Agreements Blog.
  • In the sad but true column, “(Practically) No Comment: White House Plea for Public Input on Trade Secret Theft Draws 13 Responses advise L. Kieran Kieckhefer and Warrington Parker for Orrick’s Trade Secrets Watch Blog. For 2 of the 13 responses, see Peter Torren’s opinion here and my submission here.
  • “New Oklahoma Law Clarifies Enforceability of Non-Solicitation of Employee Covenants” reports Daniel Joshua Salinas for Seyfarth Shaw’s Trading Secrets Blog.
  • Jason Cornell of Fox Rothschild provides “A Comparison Of New York And Florida Law Governing Non-Compete Agreements” for Mondaq.
  • “Can My Employer Enforce A Noncompete When We Get Our Customers Through Bidding?” asks Donna Ballman in her Screw You Guys, I’m Going Home Blog.
  • A New York Federal “Court Finds Potential Liability For Sending Cease And Desist Letter reports Lauri Rasnick for Epstein Becker’s Trade Secrets & Noncompete Blog. For more on the risks of a claim of intentional interference from a cease and desist letter, see my post here.
  • “District of Connecticut Addresses Trade Secret Act Preemption advises Eric Ostroff in his Protecting Trade Secrets Blog.
  • “Why Non-Competes are bad for the economy,” advises Laura Ellerman for Frith & Ellerman’s Virginia Non-Compete Law Blog.
  • “Public Policy Trumps Non-Compete in North Carolina,” reports Eric Welsh for Parker Poe’s Trade Secrets & Unfair Competition Reporter Blog.
  • “Medical Device Manufacturer Bound By The Restrictive Covenants It Implemented,” reports Zachary Jackson for Epstein Becker’s Trade Secrets & Non-Compete Blog.

Cybersecurity Posts and Articles:

  • In an interesting Op-Ed piece for The New York Times entitled “Elizabethan Cyberwar,” Jordan Chandler Hersch and Sam Adelsberg liken the current cyber conflict between China and the U.S. to the battle for the seas between Elizabethan England and Spain, arguing that China is sponsoring cyber-pirates to level the playing field with the U.S.
  • “Facebook Urges Cooperation To Tackle Mobile Security Risks,” reports Law360.
  • “Mobile Device Forensics – Are You in the Know?” asks James Whitehead in a guest post for Seyfarth Shaw’s Trading Secrets Blog.
  • The IP Commission’s adoption of the “hack back” defense continues to stir controversy. GCN’s William Jackson asks “The hack-back vs. the rule of law: Who wins?” and Lisa Shuchman expresses concern in “IP Theft Report Offers Over-the-Top Solutions” for Corporate Counsel.
  • And The Wall Street Journal’s Christopher Matthews chimes in as well, in “Support Grows to Let Cybertheft Victims ‘Hack Back.'”
  • Public Interest “Group Backs FTC Authority In Wyndham Data Breach Case,” reports Law360.

Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Posts and Cases:

  • “Recent Alleged Cyberattack By Ex-Employee Demonstrates Importance of Employer Diligence On Protecting Network Passwords,” advises Robert Milligan for Seyfarth Shaw’s Trading Secrets Blog.